Library

Cats + Treatment

  • Mothballs are solid pesticides that slowly release a vapor to kill and repel moths, their larvae, and other insects from stored clothing and fabric. Mothballs are sometimes also used to repel snakes, mice, and other animals, although this use is not recommended and can be harmful to pets, children, and the environment.

  • Most cats instinctively hide their pain as a survival mechanism which can make detecting pain in cats a challenge. Although the signs may be subtle, careful observation of a cat’s everyday behaviors will often reveal pain when it is present. These signs may include changes in behavior, mobility, elimination, and grooming habits. Common pain medications include NSAIDs and opioids. Your veterinarian will choose the appropriate drugs based on your cat's specific needs.

  • Penetrating wounds such as sticks, arrows, or gunshots can be life-threatening though the outer appearance of a wound may not seem as severe. Take immediate steps to calm your pet, stabilize any foreign body that is present, and get your pet to your veterinarian. Surgery may be necessary after your pet is stabilized.

  • After arriving at home, you should keep your cat warm and comfortable by providing a soft clean bed, ideally in a quiet and draft-free room at a comfortable room temperature. Your cat should remain indoors. For most procedures, your cat's activity should be restricted for one full week after surgery. Some cats experience nausea after general anesthesia, so dividing meals into smaller portions may decrease the risk of nausea and vomiting.

  • Pyelonephritis is an upper urinary tract infection involving the kidneys and ureters. Many cats have no clinical signs when they have pyelonephritis, although they may have signs of lower urinary tract disease. Pyelonephritis is usually caused by a bacterial infection that moves up the urinary tract from the bladder to the kidneys. Cats with sudden pyelonephritis do well and return to normal health unless concurrent complications exist.

  • Radiation therapy is the medical use of high dose radiation to destroy cancer cells by damaging the cells’ DNA to interfere with cell replication and kill them. It may be used on its own or in combination with other treatments, such as surgery or chemotherapy, or to reduce the size of very large tumors prior to surgery. There are several radiation protocols used in veterinary medicine. Your veterinary oncologist will choose the therapy most appropriate for your pet’s individual situation.

  • Because of their anti-inflammatory properties, corticosteroids are a valuable class of medications. They are commonly used to treat mild inflammatory conditions and/or to suppress the inflammation associated with an allergic response. When administered in high doses, they act as immunosuppressant drugs meaning they suppress or prevent an immune response. Corticosteroids have both short-term and long-term side effects including increased drinking/eating and increased risk of infections. Corticosteroids can be life-saving medications and improve the quality of life for many cats.

  • Administering supplemental fluids can benefit cats with a variety of medical conditions. Giving injections is outside the comfort zone for almost anyone outside the medical profession; however, subcutaneous fluid administration is not nearly as difficult as it sounds. Your veterinary healthcare team will provide you with all the equipment that you will need to administer fluids to your cat. They will go through the steps with you in person. Do not use the fluid bag if cloudiness or discoloration develops in the fluids.

  • The main objectives of fracture repair are to promote rapid healing of the fracture and to get the cat using its leg as quickly as possible. In most cases, this involves rebuilding the broken bone and fixing it in that position with metallic implants. Post-operative care includes pain medications, antibiotics, adequate nutrition, exercise restriction, and physiotherapy. Most fractures can be repaired very effectively and in many cases, your cat will resume normal activity.

  • Nebulization and coupage are two techniques used in the treatment of lung disease. Nebulization is a term used to describe the delivery of a fine mist to the lungs. Coupage is a technique that can be performed by veterinary staff and pet owners to help clear secretions from the lungs.

Location Hours
Monday8:00am – 6:30pm
Tuesday8:00am – 6:30pm
Wednesday8:00am – 6:30pm
Thursday8:00am – 6:30pm
Friday8:00am – 6:30pm
Saturday8:00am – 1:00pm
SundayClosed

*Consultations always by appointment

After Hours

For after hours emergencies call sashvets.com on (02) 9889 0289.

Download Our Mobile App